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Information Literacy Instruction @ Polk State College: Information Literacy @ Polk State College

This guide provides information literacy curriculum resources for faculty, instructional guidance for students and descriptions of the PSC libraries information literacy program offerings.

What is Information Literacy?

According to the Association of College and Research Libraries, "Information Literacy is the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information".  Essentially, information literacy combines the specialized techniques of searching print and electronic information resources with certain thinking skills - analytical thinking, strategic thinking, critical thinking, and decision making - applied to solving problems using information.  

Is computer literacy necessary for information literacy?  You bet!  Accessing the today's world of electronic information over the Internet and other networks and in the library itself certainly requires one to know how to operate a computer and to use a Web browser to access electronic resources.  However, being computer literate does not make one proficient in dealing with information.  First and foremost, the analytical and critical thinking skills associated with information literacy enable one to be a successful information researcher and user.  Second, the techniques associated with electronic and print  information retrieval are specialized skills irrespective of the skills needed to operate a computer.  Information literacy thinking processes (such as articulating an information need as a research problem, search strategy development, choosing the best research tools and information formats, and evaluating information) and specialized technical skills (such as Boolean searching, advanced search engine use and understanding subject classification systems) are usually not addressed in a computer literacy curriculum.  These processes and skills comprise the information literacy curriculum and drive information literacy learning outcomes. 

AACU Information Literacy VALUE Rubric

AACU INFORMATION LITERACY VALUE RUBRIC

The VALUE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty. The rubrics articulate fundamental criteria for each learning outcome, with performance descriptors demonstrating progressively more sophisticated levels of attainment. The rubrics are intended for institutional-level use in evaluating and discussing student learning, not for grading. The core expectations articulated in all 15 of the VALUE rubrics can and should be translated into the language of individual campuses, disciplines, and even courses. The utility of the VALUE rubrics is to position learning at all undergraduate levels within a basic framework of expectations such that evidence of learning can by shared nationally through a common dialog and understanding of student success. 

Definition:  The ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand. - Adopted from the National Forum on Information Literacy. 

Framing Language:  This rubric is recommended for use evaluating a collection of work, rather than a single work sample in order to fully gauge students’ information skills. Ideally, a collection of work would contain a wide variety of different types of work and might include: research papers, editorials, Speeches, grant proposals, marketing or business plans, PowerPoint presentations, posters, literature reviews, position papers, and argument critiques to name a few. In addition, a description of the assignments with the instructions that initiated the student work would be vital in providing the complete context for the work. Although a student’s final work must stand on its own, evidence of a student’s research and information gathering processes, such as a research journal/diary, could provide further demonstration of a student’s information proficiency and for some criteria on this rubric would be required.

[American Association of Colleges and Universities. Information Literacy Value Rubric. Washington, D.C.: 2013. Web.]

Propaganda, Bias and Advertising

Course Integrated Information Literacy Instruction at the PSC Libraries

Polk State instructors are encouraged to make information literacy part of their curriculum.  The libraries provide a variety of course integrated information literacy instruction options.

Information Literacy Modules

Module 1 - Library collections, services and tools *

Module 2 - Databases  *

Module 3 - Internet Resources *

* The Lakeland campus library has an 18 seat information literacy computer classroom.  If you have a larger class, please consider breaking the instruction up into two sessions.   As another option for larger classes, we encourage faculty to reserve a computer classroom for database and Internet research instruction.  Call Room Reservations at 297-1010, Ext. 3436 for Lakeland room reservations or 297-1010, Ext. 5050 for Winter Haven.  Be sure to let us know what room you've reserved when you make your request for instruction.

General Overview of Library Resources

Resource, Subject, or Assignment Specific Instruction

Open Research

MODULE DESCRIPTIONS & LEARNING OUTCOMES 

Information Literacy Modules

Module 1 - Library Resources:  students will be introduced to the organization of the academic library, academic library services, using the on-line catalog to access the physical collections of the library, and print reference resources.  This module is conducted at your campus library.

Module 2 - Electronic Databases:  students will be introduced to the common types of databases made available through the library, the basic concepts for conducting database research (i.e. field searching, controlled vocabulary vs. key word  searching, Boolean searching, limiting, etc.), and will understand the difference between database resources and the resources of the World Wide Web.  This module is most effective when it is conducted in a computer classroom where students can gain valuable guided hands-on experience.  Instructors requesting this option should reserve a computer classroom by contacting Sharon Bevis at 297-1010, Ext. 5050 well in advance of the scheduled session.  Please be sure to note the computer classroom number on the request form.  If a computer classroom isn't available, this session can be conducted in the library.  We will attempt to reserve a video projector for the session, but again, advance notice will ensure the availability of a projector. NOTE:  It is assumed that students have achieved a basic level of computer literacy using the Windows operating system and are familiar with using a World Wide Web browser such as Netscape or Microsoft Internet Explorer..  

Module 3 - Internet Research:  students will be introduced to terminology and search techniques common to Internet search engines, including techniques used narrow search results and achieve higher degrees of result relevancy.  Students will learn skills and techniques used to evaluate the quality of information retrieved over the Internet and will recognize data and information needed for Internet citation documentation.  Instructors requesting this option should reserve a computer classroom by contacting Sharon Bevis at 297-1010, Ext. 5050 well in advance of the scheduled session.  Please be sure to note the computer classroom number on the request form.  If a computer classroom isn't available, this session can be conducted in the library.  We will attempt to reserve a video projector for the session, but again, advance notice will ensure the availability of a projector. NOTE:  It is assumed that students have achieved a basic level of computer literacy using the Windows operating system and are familiar with using a World Wide Web browser such as Netscape or Microsoft Internet Explorer.

General Overview of Library Resources

Students will be exposed to the organization of the library and the print and electronic resources provided to students.  Students will understand the types of materials available in the library's physical collections and will know what tools to use to access these materials.  Students will be introduced to the services available to them at the library and will be exposed the variety of electronic resources available, including the library's Web site.  This option is conducted at your campus library during a single class period.

Resource, Subject, or Assignment Specific Instruction 

Students will be oriented to a specific resource or research tool, or set of resources or research tools, to support research in a particular subject area, to master the use of the designated resource or tool, or to complete the research and information gathering phase of a specific assignment.

Open Research

Students will have the opportunity to utilize the class period to work on individual or group projects under direction of the course instructor and consultation from Reference Librarian.  Open research is recommended as a follow-up to information literacy instruction.

How to Request and Schedule a Course Integrated Information Literacy Instruction Sessions

Scheduling one of your classes for information literacy instruction is simply a matter of visiting or contacing the reference desk at your campus library.  A form for this purpose is available at the reference desk and librarians can collaborate with you to design your information literacy instruction session.  Please schedule your sessions as early in advance as possible to ensure availabitlity and to give us some time to prepare our presentation.  Each session is customized to meet the needs of your class.  Faculty are expected to be present during the session unless a prior arrangement is made for a substitute and the library is notified of such.

Lakeland Reference Desk:     
297-1010, ext. 6207
Winter Haven Reference Desk:
 
297-1010, ext. 5326

 

One Credit Information Literacy Online Course

LIS-2004:  Introduction to Internet Research - Dazed and confused by the quantity and quality of research results from the Internet?  STOP SURFING, get off your board and learn the techniques the pro's use to research the Net.  This 1 credit course is offered each fall and spring term and is a 100% online course.  Contact Jarrod at the Winter Haven campus library, 863-297-1040 for details.

 

Video Tutorials

Interactive Tutorials

What about the Web & Web 2.0

Social networks, blogs, wikis, filing sharing sites, virtual worlds, mash-ups, .....  The vast array of information resource types on the Internet today seem only limited by the imagination.   Despite the hype, information on the Internet can often be inaccurate, out of date, misleading, or just plain wrong.  Always think critically when using the open WWW for scholarly research or use sites referenced or recommended by acknowledged experts in the fields being researched.  It's not wrong to use these resources, but critical thinking will ensure that you use them correctly for your intended purpose.  Surf smart!

 

What About Government Documents?

Searching the Web - Advanced (Atomic Learning)

 FIRST LOGIN TO YOUR POLKSTATE COLLEGE PASSPORT ACCOUNT.  THEN CLICK ON "ATOMIC LEARNING"

Searching the Web - Advanced

A. Effective Internet Search Strategies

B. Top Ten Searching Tips

C. Advanced Search Site Features

D. Browser-based Search Tools

E. Shared & Social Bookmarking Tools

F. Search Site Member Benefits

G. Specialized Search Sites

H. Web Site Evaluation Techniques

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